State Convention of Colored Men

State Convention of Colored Men

Christian Recorder: January 28, 1871

To the Colored People of the State of Georgia:

Our precarious condition in this State, which has been enhanced by the results of our recent election, makes it highly necessary that we take some action in the premises.—Whatever is done, must, in order to be effective, be the work of mature deliberation, where all the statesmanship, experience, and intellectual sagacity in our possession can be brought into requisition, especially so, since questions involving momentous issues touching the destiny of our people, may have to be considered and passed upon. Therefore being deputed by the advice and solicitation of a number of high officials, and Representative Colored men in different parts of the State, I hereby call a convention, to held in the city of Atlanta, Wednesday, February 1st, 1871.

Each county will be entitled to the same number of Delegates as are provided by law for the Lower House of the General Assembly, except ex-members of the late Constitutional Convention and of the Legislature, and one Minister of the Gospel from each county, who are, by virtue of their positions, invited extra. Representative Colored gentlemen from other States, who may design to visit us, may expect the courteous usual from those whose interest and destiny are identical. The people are requested to send the most intelligent men in their counties are Delegates, and supply them with means to meet their board and travelling expenses, and to furnish them with all the documentary information possible relative to the late Election, School Organization, Labor Movements, Administration of Justice, Emigration Feeling, Acquisition of Property, and the general condition of our people, etc. Delegates are expected to remain at least three days in session, or till their work is completed. Newspapers throughout the State friendly to the colored people will please copy

H.M. Turner and others.